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Specialized freelance translation office

Member of the SFT

Caroline LELONG
Frédéric MAGNANT
McKinley PINIER

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Translation from ENGLISH, GERMAN, and ROMANIAN into FRENCH
 
and from FRENCH and JAPANESE into ENGLISH

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Medical, pharmaceutical translation
Scientific
Legal
Economic
Business communications
International organizations
General editorial
IT
Marketing


  Consult the translation buying guide endorsed by the American Translators Association and the Institute of Translation and Interpreting



Translation - Getting it right



  

"Translators have a part to play in civilization. They serve as bridges between peoples. They pass along what’s in the mind of human beings from one to another; they provide the transmission of ideas. By means of them one nation’s wisdom gets to mingle with another nation’s wisdom. Productive encounters. Interbreedings are just as necessary for thought as for bloodlines.
Another activity of translators is that they superimpose idioms on top of others and occasionally, by straining hard to transfer and to stretch the meaning of words into meanings in other languages, they enhance the elasticity of language. Provided it doesn’t reach the breaking point such an extension of the idiom helps it evolve and broaden itself.
The human mind outsizes all idioms. Not all languages express the same amount. From such an ocean, each draws what it can. Dialects use their receptacle to draw from it. Great writers are the ones who provide the bulk of such
enormity. 
(...)
Where one idiom halts, another goes on. What one expresses, another fails to. Beyond all idioms we spot what hasn’t been expressed. And beyond what is not expressed is what can’t be expressed.
The translator is forever weighing meanings and equivalents. There is no scale more delicate than the one on which synonyms are balanced.
(...)
Idioms do require an effort.
This explains the inherent difficulty of translations.
(...)
Add external difficulties to the inner difficulties; to the obstacles in the language and to the obstacles in the writer, add the complications surrounding the translator; factor in the prejudices of the day, national dislikes, issues infected by rhetoric, scruples, timidities, silly modesties, local taste’s resistance to universally widespread taste.
(...)
Great writers enrich languages, good translators slow down their impoverishment."

Victor Hugo, Philosophical writings - Translators. Translated by Duane Larrieu.


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